#19: Label partitions

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On Linux devices and their partitions are named automatically when being plugged in. They have a base name (for SCSI devices it's sd), a device identifier (a lowercase letter) and a number for every partition. These names depend on the order in which the devices are plugged in, so they are not static at all.

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#18: GNU find operators

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This is not a tutorial about find in general as you might expect it. find, and the GNU variant in particular, is very complex and can't be covered in one short blog post and actually, there are many good tutorials on the Internet. Instead, this blog post concentrates on one single aspect of find: operators.

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#17: Process substitution

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You probably know command substitution. Command substitution executes a command and uses its output as a variable on the shell. The operator for this is either the backtick operator. But did you also know that there is a counterpart of command substitution? This counterpart is called process substitution.

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#16: Introduction to lsof and fuser

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You've probably heard of lsof and fuser. Since on UNIX systems everything is a file, these tools are absolutely important to know for each system administrator. They can make your work easier and they can also help identifying attacks on your system.

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#15: Named and unnamed pipes

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Pipes are used very often on UNIX systems. They connect two programs in that way that the STDOUT of the first program becomes the STDIN of the second program.

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#14: Using screen

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If you work on remote servers via SSH and don't want to open multiple connections, or if you don't have a graphical terminal emulator and don't want to open several concurrent ttys, screen is the right tool for you.

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#13: Printable vim cheat sheets

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Vi and its successor vim are both very mighty and well known tools. Some love them, some hate them. But overall, they're complex. If you are about to learn vim, it's probably a good idea to have a well arranged cheat sheet or reference card of the most important keyboard commands. It's not very difficult to find one, there are hundreds of thousands of cheat sheets, but many consist of HTML tables and are ugly or confusing. Only a few are really suitable for printing and having them on the desk

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#12: Restarting web server gracefully

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After upgrading your web server you need to restart it, but how is this done correctly? Just killing the server would interrupt all connections and that could cause problems such as inconsistent data and angry users. So what we need to do is to restart the web server gracefully so that all connections being served can finish. Once all connections are closed, the server restarts.

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#11: Understanding Linux man pages

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man is probably one of the most used Linux commands at all. Less known, however, is that man is more than just man.

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#10: Using xargs

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One very helpful tool that exists on many Unix-like systems is xargs. xargs is built to receive standard input (STDIN) and pass it as command-line parameters to a specified command.

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